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New Research Explores How Visually Impaired Babies Perceive the World

According to new research, visually impaired babies rely more on touch than hearing to respond to the world around them, but both senses will be important in designing tools to help them develop. Researchers at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) in Italy and the University of Birmingham in the UK collaborated to compare how sighted, and visually impaired babies reacted to different stimuli.

New research explores how visually impaired babies perceive the world

New research explores how visually impaired babies perceive the world

An infant is touching an object. Visually impaired babies rely more on touch than hearing to respond to the world around them, but both senses will be important in designing tools to help them develop. 

Multisensory spatial perception in visually impaired infants

Monica Gori, Claudio Campus, Sabrina Signorini, Eleonora Rivara, Andrew J. Bremner

Infants with severe visual impairment have a distinct phenotype of multisensory spatial perception. Compared to sighted infants, they show attenuated audiotactile spatial integration and interference, have a more limited influence of body representations on tactile space, and place a greater weight on tactile than auditory cues.

ERC Starting Grant
Principal Investigator: Monica Gori
Period: 1/2021- 12/2025. G.A: 948349

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